Architectural Model Making Advice For Students

Architectural Model Making Advice For Students

The 1709 Blog: Building models for architectural ...I am now an expert model maker I was once a student at the Welsh School of Architecture where they viewed designs as an essential part of the design process. The first and most important action for any architectural model making project is to develop a clear goal for the model. The scale of architectural designs is a ratio - in other words, the relative size of the model to the real thing. If the area you need to design is 100 metres x 100 metres square, your 1:200 scale model would be 500mm x 500mm (100 x 5mm).
Really typically it is trainees with great design making abilities that do not complete their architectural model, merely due to the fact that their interest has got the much better of them and they have actually tried to show too much.



Let me discuss first of all that I am writing this from the perspective of someone who has actually had personal experience of having to make architectural designs with restricted resources. I am now an expert model maker I was once a student at the Welsh School of architecture model where they saw models as an important part of the style procedure.
Planning your architectural model.
The very first and essential action for any architectural design making task is to establish a clear goal for the model. In other words, what is the model for, what is its function, what does it need to communicate? Extremely couple of people have the budget plan and resources to make a model that shows everything about their task. It is more sensible to pick an element of your design that the design can show well.
If you are developing a building in a sensitive area, a black and white massing design can reveal the general form and design of your design and how it sits in its context. Another method is to let your drawings reveal the basic overview of your project and use an architectural model to show one of the in-depth aspects. Or you might make a sectional model that slices through the building to show the internal spatial company.
The crucial thing is to start with a clear purpose for your architectural model and after that work out what sort of model will best achieve your objectives.
What scale should the architectural design be?
Once you have actually decided what your model requires to illustrate, the next step is select the most proper scale. If you need to show a big location, perhaps for a site context model, you would have to select a smaller scale, say 1:500 or even 1:1000.
If the function of the model is to reveal simply the building itself you could think about 1:200 or perhaps 1:100 scale. At these scales you can reveal windows, doors, terraces, etc. However, if your objective is to show a particular location or detailed element of the building you might well require to go larger once again, say 1:50 scale or even 1:20 scale.
Whatever the function of your design, having the ability to understand scales will allow you to work out practical, attainable choices for your particular job. Numerous students will currently have a clear understanding of scales and those who have can avoid this next bit, but if you are a little unclear on the subject it is most likely worth reading.
Scales are really very basic. The scale of architectural designs is a ratio - simply put, the relative size of the design to the genuine thing. For example, 1:1 scale (we would say it as "one to one") would be a life size model. Whereas, 1:10 scale (" one to ten" or "one tenth scale") would be one tenth of real size. Also, 1:100 would be one hundredth of actual size, and so on. The larger the scale sign number, the smaller the design, which implies less detail can be shown.
Another beneficial way to consider scales is to exercise the number of millimetres represent one metre at the particular scale you're thinking about. We do this by dividing 1000 by the scale indicator number. For 1:200 scale, divide 1000 by 200 and you get the response 5. Which informs you that a person metre in real life will be represented by 5mm on the design. If the location you need to design is 100 metres x 100 metres square, your 1:200 scale design would be 500mm x 500mm (100 x 5mm).
At this scale the architectural design will be one thousandth of the real size. A square site 1000 metres x 1000 metres would for that reason be 1000 millimetres square as a 1:1000 scale model.
Architectural model making materials and techniques
For the functions of this general guide I will not enter into a lot of particular information on architectural design making techniques and materials as this is a really broad location and will be covered in a separate article. Here are some standard rules to follow though.
Be reasonable about what you can achieve with the time, facilities and products readily available to you. Do not make the model and attempt program every detail of your design or you simply won't complete it. Extremely often it is trainees with good model making abilities that do not complete their architectural model, just because their enthusiasm has overcome them and they have actually attempted to reveal excessive. Or, the design does get completed however it has actually taken up so much of their time and energy that other fundamental parts of their discussion need to be hurried or do not get done at all.
It is challenging to get the balance right but it is much better to be a little less ambitious with the model and concentrate on submitting a coordinated, totally realized general discussion.
The usage of colour is another location where designs can fail. Often it's more secure to keep things monochrome (white, for instance, can look quite "architectural" and trendy) unless you're very positive with colour or it's an essential part of what your model is attempting to reveal.
Constantly present your model on a great, strong base with a tidy edge surface - this acts nearly like a picture frame and enhances the basic appearance of your model.
As far as products are concerned, unless you have simple access to a workshop and a reasonable level of experience with machinery, it would be best to deal with card or foam-board or comparable, easy-to-cut materials such as Balsa or Lime wood. To put it simply, anything that you can cut with either a sharp blade or junior hack saw and stick together with traditional shop bought glues.
And when you are cutting, if possible, try to use a square, especially if you are cutting out floor plates or elevations. Keeping everything square is important if you want to attain a cool, crisp surface for your structure. It is also worth buying a metal ruler as you will discover a plastic or wooden ruler will get harmed very quickly.
Whether you are cutting with a craft knife or a scalpel, it's better to use a number of light passes rather than trying to cut all the method through with one go. You will get a cleaner cut and you are less most likely to slip and cut your finger.
Sourcing products can be hard, but your best option is to investigate your local Art & Craft store and check also if there is an enthusiast model store in the location. These stores will typically have an excellent series of materials but do get what you need early. It is unexpected how quickly a group of students all working on a similar style quick can clear the shelves of all the finest products.